Ad Astra Per Aspera
Dear…

ohchsinad:

I will write about the following, leave one in my ask box.

Dear person I hate,

Dear person I like,

Dear ex boyfriend,

Dear ex girlfriend,

Dear ex bestfriend,

Dear bestfriend,

Dear Santa,

Dear mom,

Dear dad,

Dear future me,

Dear past me,

Dear person I’m jealous of,

Dear person I had a crush on,

Dear significant other, 

4 hours ago | 26,852 notes
humansofnewyork:

"Do you remember the saddest moment of your life?""Probably sitting at the kitchen table with my dad, an hour after my mother died, realizing we had to figure out what we were going to do for lunch."

humansofnewyork:

"Do you remember the saddest moment of your life?"
"Probably sitting at the kitchen table with my dad, an hour after my mother died, realizing we had to figure out what we were going to do for lunch."

7 hours ago | 12,746 notes
12 hours ago | 295,327 notes
1 day ago | 293,264 notes

Long Exposure Shots of Airports [via]

1 day ago | 74,234 notes
Andy, be serious. You are not trying. You are whining. What is it that you want me to say to you, huh? Do you want me to say, “Poor you. Miranda’s picking on you. Poor you. Poor Andy”? Hmm? Wake up, six. She’s just doing her job. Don’t you know that you are working at the place that published some of the greatest artists of the century? Halston, Lagerfeld, de la Renta. And what they did, what they created was greater than art because you live your life in it. Well, not you, obviously, but some people. You think this is just a magazine, hmm? This is not just a magazine. This is a shining beacon of hope for… oh, I don’t know… let’s say a young boy growing up in Rhode Island with six brothers pretending to go to soccer practice when he was really going to sewing class and reading Runway under the covers at night with a flashlight. You have no idea how many legends have walked these halls. And what’s worse, you don’t care. Because this place, where so many people would die to work you only deign to work. And you want to know why she doesn’t kiss you on the forehead and give you a gold star on your homework at the end of the day. Wake up, sweetheart.

~ Nigel, the Devil Wears Prada

1 day ago | 1 note

alimarko:

We Speak is a poster and blog campaign featuring ten young women who are speaking up about their relationships with mental health and how it informs their identities. Part of Launch: Stamps School of Art and Design’s Senior Thesis Exhibition at the University of Michigan, it will be featured at Work Gallery - Ann Arbor in the exhibition opening on Friday, April 18th from 6-9. The show will remain up through May 3rd. 

In the past year, the ten young women featured in the poster portion of We Speak came face to face with the state of our mental health. Our stories, carefully and honestly written, are meant to start a conversation about a topic that many of us wish we could ignore. But these are our realities, and in sharing them, we want to start chipping away at the stigma that often keeps us feeling weak and alone.

In addition to the original ten participants, everyone is encouraged to consider sharing their own story about mental health. By contributing your experiences, you can help open the discussion about the importance of mental health and tear down the stigma that keeps it so hidden. By sharing this project, you can foster support.

We Speak blog | More information | Submit your story | Mental health resources | By Alicia Kovalcheck

1 day ago | 2,728 notes

My dad thinks I’ve been indoctrinated because I’m the only person that calls him on his sexist, racist jokes and I’m “Not the same person I was” before I moved. Haha. Ha. Ha. I thought the point of being a father to a daughter was to make the world better, not make me stand up for myself. Glad you think so highly of me, pops.

1 day ago
fawnsyawn:

OH MY GOD THIS IS PERFECT

fawnsyawn:

OH MY GOD THIS IS PERFECT

2 days ago | 38,115 notes
I wonder how biology can explain the physical pain you feel in your chest when all you want to do is be with someone.

~ Dan Howell (via corruptional)

2 days ago | 360,280 notes

 

2 days ago | 171,276 notes

dutchster:

To the boys who may one day date my daughter

watch it till the end…

2 days ago | 2,065 notes

glamourkills:

You Can’t Take It With You

Just under my photo, there’s green text that says “Organ Donor.” When I was 16 and getting my driver’s license, they asked me if I’d like it printed there. I’d heard the rumors. People said if you were an organ donor, paramedics wouldn’t work as hard to save your life. I called bullshit. Print it. Take my heart for someone who needs it. You can’t take it with you.

Third period of my first day of high school, my teacher walked in and told us he wanted an essay from everyone about dying empty. I found it morbid. I was young, full of life and I was sure as shit planning to die fulfilled. I wanted to soak up every ounce of this life. I wanted to see every corner of the world and so empty was not an option for me. Of course, that’s not what he meant.

I think I was 18 when I truly realized that I don’t believe in god. The last hurdle for me was the same as it is for a lot of people. We’re afraid to die and rightfully so. Religion quells some of that fear. The idea of an afterlife is comforting. You do some nice things, you give 10% of your income to the church, you follow the rules and you get an everlasting paradise. 

I’ve relegated myself to the idea that this is the only shot I’ve got. I’ve started to understand what my 10th grade English teacher was talking about. For me, there’s no eternity, no reincarnation, no pearly gates. For me, the only shot at being infinite I have is to leave a legacy worth remembering. I wasn’t born empty. We’re not shells waiting to be filled in by the world. We aren’t a collection of the things we’ve seen. We’re born with something to offer. We’re born full of potential. Potential to change the world. Potential to break down walls. We’re born full of life and I’m pouring mine out everyday. I’m giving it to everyone I meet because someday, I’m gonna die; we all are, and when that day comes, you can’t take it with you.

-Dan “Soupy” Campbell

Photos: Travis Zachary

2 days ago | 3,972 notes
Americans may live in the richest country in the world, but it is in a society where about 10% of the population possesses nearly 90% of the nation’s assets. In a country of 312 million people the entire ruling class can fit comfortably into Yankee Stadium, with room left over to generously pass out free tickets to thousands of the 46.2 million Americans living below the poverty line. Democracy can never fulfill its potential under such circumstances, and the vaunted “American dream” is fast fading for the working class/middle class as the U.S. economic system seems headed into a second recession and the weakening of Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid. Isn’t it time for the American people to directly question what’s wrong with capitalism, or at least inquire, in the words of an old saying: “Where are we going and what are we doing in this hand basket?”
3 days ago | 1,301 notes

So this little cigarette right here has sparked a whole new brand of TFiOS hate, much of which is coming from people who claimed to love the book. 
Many people are now pointing out how “pretentious” Augustus is, and I can’t help but think, You’re only just now realizing this. He was written to be a seemingly pretentious and arrogant person. The acknowledgement of this is actually highly important because, without it, the book loses the message that a hero’s journey is that of strength to weakness. 
Augustus Waters has big dreams for himself. He wants to be known and remembered; he wants to be a hero; he wants to be seen as perfect. But there’s already something standing in his way… He has a disability, and society tells him that a person cannot be both perfect and disabled. So what does he do? He creates a persona for himself. He tries to appear older and wiser than he is. But the pretentious side of him is NOT who he truly is. It’s all an act. (This is evident in the fact that he often uses words in the wrong context.)
And when his cancer returns, we begin to see his mask cracking. The true Augustus begins to bleed through… Hazel even takes notice of this from time to time. And by the time we get to the gas station scene, Augustus is no longer the picture of perfection he was when we met him. The play has been canceled. The actor must reveal himself. And he’s revealed to be a weak, defenseless boy, succumbing to the cancer that is made of him. 
THE PRETENTIOUSNESS IS INTENTIONAL. It stands to show Augustus’s journey from flawless to flawed, from strong to weak. It’s the key to understanding that Augustus was the hero he always wanted to be, even if he didn’t realized it. 

So this little cigarette right here has sparked a whole new brand of TFiOS hate, much of which is coming from people who claimed to love the book. 

Many people are now pointing out how “pretentious” Augustus is, and I can’t help but think, You’re only just now realizing this. He was written to be a seemingly pretentious and arrogant person. The acknowledgement of this is actually highly important because, without it, the book loses the message that a hero’s journey is that of strength to weakness

Augustus Waters has big dreams for himself. He wants to be known and remembered; he wants to be a hero; he wants to be seen as perfect. But there’s already something standing in his way… He has a disability, and society tells him that a person cannot be both perfect and disabled. So what does he do? He creates a persona for himself. He tries to appear older and wiser than he is. But the pretentious side of him is NOT who he truly is. It’s all an act. (This is evident in the fact that he often uses words in the wrong context.)

And when his cancer returns, we begin to see his mask cracking. The true Augustus begins to bleed through… Hazel even takes notice of this from time to time. And by the time we get to the gas station scene, Augustus is no longer the picture of perfection he was when we met him. The play has been canceled. The actor must reveal himself. And he’s revealed to be a weak, defenseless boy, succumbing to the cancer that is made of him. 

THE PRETENTIOUSNESS IS INTENTIONAL. It stands to show Augustus’s journey from flawless to flawed, from strong to weak. It’s the key to understanding that Augustus was the hero he always wanted to be, even if he didn’t realized it. 

3 days ago | 92,208 notes
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